Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Liberation theology freeing christians from consumerism, dogmatic bondage

Pope Frank is heading to Cuba and has scheduled an audience with President Barack Obama to discuss pending climate catastrophes.
Marking an end to one of the most divisive debates in Catholicism in the past 35 years, Pope Francis has officially declared the late Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero a martyr, clearing the way for eventually proclaiming him a saint. A hero to the progressive liberation theology movement in Latin America, which sought to place the Catholic Church on the side of the poor in struggles for social justice, Romero was shot to death in 1980 while saying Mass. [Crux]
It's estimated that christians slaughtered nearly 100 million indigenous since landing in the New World.

Even the Pope Emeritus decried consumerism from arguably the most decadent religious palace on Earth:
In his homily, Benedict lamented that Christmas has become an increasingly commercial celebration that obscures the simplicity of the message of Christ’s birth. -AP, Washington Post
Truthout may have said it even more succinctly:
But what if all roads to prosperity don't lead to the shopping mall, as most economists would have us believe? What if, in fact, all that shopping -- and the imperative to grow corporate profits quarter after quarter and continuously expand the economy -- was actually the root of many of the problems we face today? That's the view of a renegade but increasingly influential band of economists, who say the myth of perpetual economic growth and "the iron cage of consumerism" are the chief causes of world economic dysfunction and environmental crisis -- and the biggest obstacle to our very happiness.
Royal Hassrick in his 1964 groundbreaking work on the Plains Indians said, "the Sioux practiced Communism with extreme prejudice." -The Sioux: Life and Customs of a Warrior Society.

Capitalist indoctrination has destroyed hope in Indian Country where throughout herstory family and community have been more important than money and consumerism.



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