Monday, March 28, 2016

Adams launches a real free press

South Dakota's so-called Free Press is neither free nor a real press. It's a rag for the dying South Dakota Democratic Party. But Montana's John S. Adams is a real journalist and is driving for real truth.
An accomplished political reporter, Adams had recently left the Great Falls Tribune amid a much-publicized Gannett restructuring. A couple of Montana’s top political journalists had just been let go by another chain when we spoke, creating a hole in the state’s media ecosystem. At the time, Adams was underemployed and eager to get back to work. But he wasn’t ready to be a media entrepreneur. They’ve just started raising money, about $5,000 in the first few weeks. But since January, Adams has placed MTFP stories in more than a dozen outlets, including the state’s major newspapers. He hopes to obtain significant grant support over the first year, and eventually to develop a broad, sustainable mix of small and large donors. [Columbia Journalism Review]
Montana Free Press is covering the corruption trial of Republican Bozeman legislator, Art Wittich.

Last year Lee Newspapers of Montana eviscerated their Capital bureau. Mike Dennison went to a Montana teevee station. Former Lee reporter, Martin Kidston recently launched the Missoula Current.

Gifted journalist, Emily Saunders, who covered Idaho politics left Boise Public Radio to work for Montana's Office of Public Instruction as communications liaison.

Tony Mangan left radio journalism in Pierre to work for South Dakota's Department of 'Public Safety' as its public voice.

Ben Dunsmoor covered Pierre during the legislative session: he left KELO teevee for public relations.

That pretty much leaves Bob Mercer to write the gloomy news from South Dakota's capital city.

If Texas leads with over fifty journalists covering Austin and South Dakota's number covering Pierre approaches zero the Reichstag has already purged the truth.

Montana is the water tower for parts of two countries, essential to reintroducing bison, and is critical habitat in efforts to rewild the western Missouri River basin. Following policy and politics there is a necessary part of understanding the Eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains.

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