Tuesday, October 4, 2011

Barrick bought off GFP to look the other way in Whitewood Creek

Bill Harlan reported the swindle:
Homestake and its parent company, Barrick Gold Corp. of Toronto, have agreed to those terms, but GF&P Secretary John Cooper warned that if the state doesn't act, some of the most spectacular scenery in the Black Hills could end up in private hands. "Without public acquisition of these lands, it appears inevitable, that Barrick will sell these lands to developers that seek to build trophy homes," Cooper wrote in a letter accompanying his proposal. He argued that even Roughlock Falls could become privately owned, "thus locking out a public treasure." Money for the $3.3 million deal would not come from taxpayers, Cooper said. In fact, most of it would come from Homestake. Cooper hopes to use about $3.1 million that the state already has been awarded as compensation for cyanide and other hazardous substances Homestake dumped into Whitewood Creek for decades. The creek was named a Superfund site in 1981, but Homestake completed restoration in 1994, and the creek was taken off the Superfund list in 1996. In 1997, however, South Dakota and Indian tribes sued Homestake. The settlement established the Whitewood Creek Restoration Fund. The state's share of the complicated settlement was about $2.7 million, which has grown with interest to about $3.1 million. Cooper hopes to use that money to buy the Homestake land.
The entire northern portion of this slag heap is in an hydrologically active draw and moving toward it is a slide from an event above it. It's a slag glacier preparing to calf again.

Deadwood mayor Francis A. Toscana told ip in a phone interview that his concern is for the flood potential posed by slide activity.

Where the removed slag might go remains a mystery.

UPDATE: Kevin Woster's story at the Rapid City Journal.

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